Cloudberry Flowers Confetti

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Photography credit: Sansom Photography

The roses and cornflowers starting to bloom in the garden signals the start of a new confetti making season for me. Over the last couple of years, I have experimented with growing and drying different flower petals in my garden until I found my favourite, unique and special mixture to make my biodegradable confetti. Here is a bit of an insight into what I have been doing in the last two weeks to start making this year’s supply.

As soon as I spot the first roses and cornflowers blooming in the garden I get ready to make new confetti.

I wait for a good dry day and with a clean pair of snips go around my garden to find my flowers. I am fussy about the ones I use for my confetti. They must have newly opened up to reveal their petals and be completely dry when I cut them. Any petals starting to go over with mottled edges or wet marks are no good and rejected. Some roses work well to dry and others not. I know now which are my favourites in the garden to use for confetti and the others are left to enjoy. All my cornflowers in their varying colours make excellent confetti and I add larkspur, calendula and lavender to this if it is in season.

When I have cut my flowers they are laid out separately and checked again. If they are cornflowers, calendula or larkspur they are dried whole but if they are roses I separate out each petal, again checking for any marks and only keeping the perfect ones. These are then laid out to dry.

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If it is a hot dry day outside with no wind they can dry there or in trays in my conservatory where it is nice and warm. It normally takes a couple of days for the petals to become very dry and ready to be mixed.

The confetti is then kept in air tight jars in my airing cupboard. The dry dark environment of this storage space means that the confetti will keep well for months. It is a long time now since any towels or linen were in my airing cupboard!

When I receive an order for confetti I measure it into a jug to the 1 litre mark and then carefully pour it into a cellophane gift bag and tie it with twine, ready for an event or wedding. 1 litre of confetti is enough for 10-12 handfuls.

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I continue making confetti each year from June until October or November depending on the frosts. As it stores so well it is available all year round.

People have asked me before if the confetti has any scent. It actually loses the scent of the roses during the drying process and I don’t like to add any artificial scent into the confetti, preferring to keep it as natural as possible. If lavender has been in season and added to some of the bags it may have a faint scent from this.

What can you use biodegradable confetti for? Here are a few ideas…

  • Decorating tables at a wedding, party or event
  • Decorating an aisle to walk down when you get married
  • To be given to your guests to throw at your wedding.

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As well as 1 litre bags of confetti for weddings and events I also make smaller kraft boxes for guests to take which provides enough for 1-2 handfuls to throw over the bride and groom.

I have loved developing my recipe for confetti over the last few years, annually planning what to grow for it and then handpicking those flowers when they bloom. My confetti is colourful, eco friendly, biodegradable, handpicked, homegrown in Scotland and made with a lot of love.  I hope you like it and please just get in touch anytime if you would like more information or to order some for your event or wedding.

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Photography credit: Sansom Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

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